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20121201
20121231
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Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
, president obama toured the chrysler jefferson north assembly plant in detroit, michigan, july 30th, 2010. how did the workers get their job back two years later? uaw, the union that represents them in collective bargaining provided for arbitration. the arbiter sided with workers. chrysler's response, unfortunately the company was put in difficult position because the way the story was investigated and ultimately revealed to the public. these employees from jeff north have been off work more than two years and the time has come to put the situation behind us and put focus on quality products. the president back in detroit today with scheduled visit to the daimler detroit diesel plant in redford, michigan, a different one. martha: good old-fashioned investigative reporting on this one. caught on camera moments you have to see to believe. my favor when they chuck the bottle in the woods when done drinking with it. >> reporter: you really do. as attorney, understanding the arbitration process it is hard to understand how when you see what they did, they got their jobs back. take a look at th
, look at these violent scenes from michigan. the right to work battle was far from peaceful in the state capital yesterday, and it's not over. why are these unions so angry about giving workers free choice? why is so much of the news media carrying the union's water by not reporting the story? we'll have some answers in just a little while. now, the market gyrated today over ben bernanke and the fed. at first they loved the new bond buying and money printing message. but then they gave up all their gains feeling unemployment may drop faster and the party would somehow be over. i'm not sure i understand this but we'll ask our experts mike, i gue i guess the idea is maybe the unemployment gets to 6.5% and the 0 interest rate goes up, why would that be bad? sometimes i don't understand the stock market at all. >> i don't think it's the employment figure. i think it's the inflation number that bernanke threw out there, larry. you also mentioned 2.5% inflation as being certainly that would look him put the brakes on. we look at treasuries relative to tips, it's a at 3.08%. i think the market
opponents are expected to converge on michigan's capitol today. the protest is expected to swell to thousands tomorrow when the state house and senate will try to hammer out a final version which will make michigan the 24th right to work state. supporters say the legislation will spark economic growth and encourage fairness. opponents say it will lower wages and benefits and hurt the middle class and that strong unions built michigan's middle class. >> so fedex is bracing for the busiest day ever. ever. the company is expecting to handle 19 million packages today. that's 200 packs per second. the internet sales are booming and that is increasing volume by 10% over last year. >> i just ordered a ton last night. >> you're single-handedly responsible -- >> i'll be part of that. get it on time. that's all i say. the daring rescue of an american held in afghanistan comes at a very steep price. we're going to go live to the pentagon for more on the top secret mission. that's coming up. ♪ ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] everyone deserves the gift of all day pain relief. this season, discov
in the dark. a light dusting of snow also fell overnight adding to the cold conditions. >>> in michigan a winter storm caused havoc on the roads, crashes were reported all effort detroit area including several that involved police cars. more than 19 inches of snow fell in some parts of michigan thursday and friday knocking out power to at least 142,000 homes and businesses. >> in wisconsin, green bay packer fans grabbed shovels to help clean up the field after a major snowstorm there. more than a foot of snow needed to be cleared. for years they have asked fans to come help shovel during massive blizzards. yesterday some lined up for more than four hours before the project was scheduled to start. those who did get a shovel got paid ten dollars an hour. >> without these people helping we couldn't dot. we have 650 people right now. we have 13 people on our staff just supervisorring it. we are moving a lot of snow. we couldn't do it without the public. >> and because of the fan effort the field is ready to go for tomorrow's game when the packers host the titans. >> hopefully they get t
counterweight hezekiah spent a lot of time with, john dingell, democrat from michigan has been serving since 1955 and previous to him, his father served in the same congressional district until his father died and his son ran and took his place. dingell used to be thought of as liberal. no to think of him as a liberal now. democrats don't because they marginalize him. they didn't find him liberal to keep them on as chairman of the all powerful commerce committee. i show it to you that even with democrats than it can already, even being removed from the pecking order of power is able to get things done. this one-of-a-kind us how to pull strings on behalf of this district and get parts appropriated, to get bills passed. he passed his pipeline safety bill come essentially regulation bill during the tea party congress almost unheard of. but t-tango is a think a dying breed. his philosophy is to govern from the center. he began writing a bill, which means to bring everybody on board and get them in a room and talk about what they would like. it's not the way of works in today's zero-sum politics
dingell, democrat from michigan and he has been serving since 1955. previouslpreviousl y his father sanded -- served in the same congressional district until his father died in the sun ran and took his place. dingell is, used to be thought of as illiberal and no one thinks of him as a liberal and certainly the democrats don't because they marginalize him. and yet thank you has proven and i show it throughout the book that even with the democrats in the minority and even with him being removed from the pecking order power, they want to get things done. this why the guy knows how to pull strings on behalf of the district to get parts appropriated to get bills passed and he passed his pipeline safety bill which is essentially a regulation bill during the tea party congress. it's almost unheard of, but dingell is i think a dying breed. his philosophy is, you govern from the center. you begin writing a bill from the center which means you bring everybody on board, put them in a room and talk about what they like. it's not the way it works in today zero some policy where their idea now the rep
, michigan, a republican caller. go ahead, frank. caller: yes. look, first of all, we need to find out like exactly who is mentally ill and who's not mentally ill and the rimets need to be like finish if someone lives in a house who is mentally ill, obviously, we cannot have weapons of any kind within their range. that's what the law should be. the law shouldn't be we shouldn't just outlaw all weapons we should just outlaw anyone who is obviously with mental issues. the guy who in virginia tech, he had a depression issue. he went to a doctor and still somehow got his hands on two .9 millimeter weapons and you can't tell me that the guy in colorado didn't have mental issue. you can just look at the guy and know that there's something wrong there. we just with to keep the weapons like out of the household or how far range for these people who have mental health. host: frank, the questions that you pose, who are the mentally ill, we will ask those types of questions tomorrow on "washington journal." we're going to have a roundtable discussion with a republican and a democrat who co chair the m
pro tempore: the gentlewoman's time has expired. the chair recognizes the gentleman from michigan, mr. curson, for five minutes. mr. curson: i ask unanimous consent to address the house for five minutes. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, so ordered. mr. curson: thank you. my thanks to the chair. today i rise to recognize mrs. carolyn coleman, executive secretary to the secretary treasurer of the international union u.a.w., on her retirement. as a member of congress, it is both my privilege and honor to recognize mrs. coleman for her many years of service and her contributions which have enriched and strengthened our communities. mrs. coleman brings a lifetime of experience to her current position to the united auto workers, a career which began in july of 1967 in the u.a.w.'s women's department. carolyn's skill and knowledge led her to be selected to premiere assignments. she directly assisted many great union leaders in their important work. including u.a.w. vice president's dick shoemaker, and carl raveson, as well as u.a.w. president owen bieber, and treasurer dennis rayh
? >> guest: that's a complicated question, and i can speak from my own experience. i live in michigan where i'm not permitted to marry, and, in fact, we are constitutionally prohibited to have heritage or similar yiewn your -- union purpose, the terrible language of our constitution. mark and i talked about getting married, say, in new york, where i'm from or another state just to, but there are complications in terms of depending on what said you then end up living in. >> host: i understand, but it's not legal where you live. the question is in places like canada or netherlands, you know, for a number of years now, and no more than 10% of people enter legal unions. >> guest: i think that's partly because in many cases, couples have already cobbled together certain limited legal structures to the extent that they can. mark and i have a big expensive binder at home, and people have done that. there's questions about how all of that get affected. i think that's partly because, as you know, given your work over the last several decades, a marriage culture takes time to build, and, you know, when
if we extend all of these middle-class tax cuts. in michigan, to share with me what $2,200 means to them. one of them said it was four months of groceries. that is a big deal. we were figuring out gallons of gas to go back and forth to work. it could buy -- for the average commuter, they could go back and forth to work for three years. when families are going into the holidays, they need to know that we get it. we see every day, republicans in the house as well as olympia snowe that urged us to come together to get this done. we have heard from tom cole that they pass the senate bill. we are hearing from house members saying to get this piece done. republicans said, why don't you get together and get things done? we know that if the discharge petition comes out before the house, they have enough votes to pass it. why wait 27 days? why not just do it now. the house needs to take up a bill that we gave them back in july. it passed on a bipartisan vote here and when is brought up in the house it will pass with a bipartisan vote. >> i want to echo a little bit of what the senator said. consu
was killed off duty in michigan in october of 1994. >> i am here because my son was murdered may 10, 2007, in chicago, illinois, on a crowded bus. >> my sister was a freshman at virginia tech. she was only 18 years old. >> my father was a professor and taught civil engineering at virginia tech and he was killed on april 16, 2007. >> my name is john woods. my girlfriend was killed that virginia tech. -- at virginia tech. >> i was shot four times at virginia tech and survived. i'm here for the 32 that did not. >> i'm from chicago and my son was murdered on church grounds while coming outside of the church. i am pleading for our leaders to help us. >> i am here on behalf of my daughter who was murdered on march 30, 2010, on south capitol street. she was 16 years old and my only child, with an ak-47. >> i came here from phoenix, arizona. i lost my son seven years ago. thank you. >> i'm here to give a voice to my baby sister who was killed when she was 15 in salt lake city. >> my daughter was killed in salt lake city. i was also seriously injured in 2007. >> my name is peter reed. my daughter
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)